esslatexpress:

thalestral:

Glasgow Violence: When Media Bias Goes Too Far 

On Thursday, 85% of the Scottish population turned out to cast their votes in the referendum on independence following days of peaceful demonstrations by Yes voters in the heart of our largest city, Glasgow. 

On Friday, Glasgow was gripped by fear as pro-union fascists rushed George Square, determined to engage in violence and hatred; the loyalists of Glasgow joined by members of the Scottish and English Defence Leagues, and all partly encouraged by Britain First.

Young girls had their Scottish flags torn away from them, women with Yes badges were spat at and called scum, nazi salutes and red hand of Ulster salutes were seen, flares were thrown, and the sectarian edge was on full display with “No Surrender” signs. Assaults were made on those carrying Saltires.

https://vine.co/v/OWPzrhni0Aj/embed

These are not the scenes reported by the BBC news or a number of newspapers who assure us that this was a “clash” between Yes and No voters, following their portrayal of Yes voters as Scottish nationalist mobs who intimidated No voters, despite little evidence to the contrary.

https://vine.co/v/OWU39hp1aJl

In truth, the police had the events of last evening well in hand. Glasgow is no stranger to sectarian trouble (a number of this mob wore Rangers tops), quickly surrounding the group and acting to restrict violence as far as possible as they departed the square and moved elsewhere. Six arrests were made and after a few hours the city was calm once more.

http://youtu.be/t46wPvXpLTs 

But what there was a disturbing lack of was information. News. People in the city and those in the rest of Scotland with friends and family in Glasgow had no idea what was happening. Those on twitter could find no information on whether things had escalated or calmed down, on where was safe and where was not.

https://vine.co/v/OWFlvihxJja

The police described the situation as “handbags”. They’ve dealt with much worse. But to write this off as sectarian violence alone excuses those fascists who travelled to take part. To write it off as only fascists excuses the local loyalists spoiling for a fight.

While the identity of the perpetrators is unknown, the one Scotland newspaper that supported independence – The Herald – had their generator set alight. The Sunday Herald is currently collecting evidence from the night to make a full report in their next edition. 

https://twitter.com/JonCoates/status/513087992106610688

Glasgow is a complicated city with a troubled past, but the level of political engagement across Scotland and within the city during this referendum was unprecedented. And almost entirely peaceful until now. Scotland had shown the world what democracy without war looks like, but while the UK media ignores the dark side of both Glasgow and the union, the international media has carried the most information on events.

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10152309438961498

That people in Glasgow, Scotland and the UK had to turn to twitter to get the real information of what was happening is incredible. And while photographs and videos were helpful in illustrating the events, there was no control on validity of information. #GlasgowRiots trended through the night despite the situation being over, while many seemed under the impression that it was Yes voters at fault.

https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=10202433758517846

Invoking the spirit of sectarianism there was no doubt trouble on both sides of that particular divide, but the swelling of ranks from fascist groups ensured that it was those bearing the Scottish flag or Yes badges that were in danger.

This was no celebration. This was no representation of No voters. These bigots represent no one but themselves. But the media turning a blind eye to this, or insinuating it is no worse than Scottish nationalists throwing an egg is irresponsible. I had friends hiding at home because they were terrified to go out on the streets without the safety of having white skin, with no idea of when the trouble was over.

There are Orange marches planned today in the city. Hopefully these idiots will stay at home. Please stay safe.

(Photo credits L-R: Jon Brady via Twitter @jonfaec; Cathal Mcnaughton / Reuters; PA; Reuters; Reuters; Herald’; Herald; Reuters; Reuters)

(My apologies that none of the media wants to embed) 

Thiss is excellent information!!

(via liamdryden)

thebrainscoop:

anotherscreamingfangirl:

Emily Graslie reminds me of the Swan Princess

titles to add to my CV from this year: 

Chief Curiosity Correspondent 
"Celebrity Nerd"
Mother of Dragons Raccoons 
Swan Princess

I am so employable 

wizardhistory:


 Pictured is The Satyr’s mask, worn originally to protect the actor’s identity in Henry Stagworth’s most controversial play. Henry Stagworth (1550-83), a famed pureblood playwright in his day with several of his works still performed, is most known for his controversial tragedy Being, Beast. Taking place in what was then modern day Scotland, it tells the tale of a pureblood witch who falls in love with a satyr. Realizing quickly that satyrs were not ravenous animals that her society portrayed, she slowly begins a descent into a pariah in ballroom scenes and elaborate feasts where she becomes increasingly aware of the hypocrisy of noble purebloods and their practices before the abrupt end in which she is caught consummating a wild marriage with her lover and subsequently put to death. Stagworth purposely left the entirety of the cast unnamed in a ploy to not allude to any pureblood families but also to force purebloods to subconsciously put themselves into the actors’ place and see how they were no better than the satyr in their oft-detestable actions and words.
                Many critics then and now theorize that Being, Beast was and is a political statement, a grand allegory for the treatment of Muggles as animals and filth and the immediate outcast for those who fraternize with non-magical society. Some historians believe that the play was a confession, for Stagworth was a known blood traitor and had subtly advocated for the protection of Muggles. He would not live to see the establishment of the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy in 1692.
                Even today, many of the more conservative-leaning witches and wizards are against Stagworth’s play being performed, often protesting against the theatre that announces they will be hosting it. In Hogwarts it is locked in the Restricted Section of its library and students are only allowed to read it with the express permission of a teacher. As such, even if its fame is comparable to the wizarding adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, it is not often talked about for fear of trodding on toes.
                Alongside its noted support of Muggle/Wizard relationships, it has distinct homoerotic subtext between two of the unnamed purebloods, and a scene with the main witch and her mother showcase how adultery was better received than the intermixing of the wizarding world with Muggles. However, none of these are openly attacks on pureblood culture at the time, which gave Stagworth much needed protection: If he was accused, the accusers would be revealed to be no better than his characters. This did not prevent him from becoming a pariah, however, and at his death he was buried in an unmarked grave in an unknown location.
                In his short lifetime, the playwright wrote several pieces alongside Being, Beast, and a number of short stories. None were as controversial as the work for which he is known for. He left no descendants, and the Stagworth family line died with him.

Mr. W. Muir, 21st of September, 2014

wizardhistory:

 Pictured is The Satyr’s mask, worn originally to protect the actor’s identity in Henry Stagworth’s most controversial play. Henry Stagworth (1550-83), a famed pureblood playwright in his day with several of his works still performed, is most known for his controversial tragedy Being, Beast. Taking place in what was then modern day Scotland, it tells the tale of a pureblood witch who falls in love with a satyr. Realizing quickly that satyrs were not ravenous animals that her society portrayed, she slowly begins a descent into a pariah in ballroom scenes and elaborate feasts where she becomes increasingly aware of the hypocrisy of noble purebloods and their practices before the abrupt end in which she is caught consummating a wild marriage with her lover and subsequently put to death. Stagworth purposely left the entirety of the cast unnamed in a ploy to not allude to any pureblood families but also to force purebloods to subconsciously put themselves into the actors’ place and see how they were no better than the satyr in their oft-detestable actions and words.

                Many critics then and now theorize that Being, Beast was and is a political statement, a grand allegory for the treatment of Muggles as animals and filth and the immediate outcast for those who fraternize with non-magical society. Some historians believe that the play was a confession, for Stagworth was a known blood traitor and had subtly advocated for the protection of Muggles. He would not live to see the establishment of the International Statute of Wizarding Secrecy in 1692.

                Even today, many of the more conservative-leaning witches and wizards are against Stagworth’s play being performed, often protesting against the theatre that announces they will be hosting it. In Hogwarts it is locked in the Restricted Section of its library and students are only allowed to read it with the express permission of a teacher. As such, even if its fame is comparable to the wizarding adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, it is not often talked about for fear of trodding on toes.

                Alongside its noted support of Muggle/Wizard relationships, it has distinct homoerotic subtext between two of the unnamed purebloods, and a scene with the main witch and her mother showcase how adultery was better received than the intermixing of the wizarding world with Muggles. However, none of these are openly attacks on pureblood culture at the time, which gave Stagworth much needed protection: If he was accused, the accusers would be revealed to be no better than his characters. This did not prevent him from becoming a pariah, however, and at his death he was buried in an unmarked grave in an unknown location.

                In his short lifetime, the playwright wrote several pieces alongside Being, Beast, and a number of short stories. None were as controversial as the work for which he is known for. He left no descendants, and the Stagworth family line died with him.

Mr. W. Muir, 21st of September, 2014

averagefairy:

the worst thing about being shy and introverted is that you most of the time come off as cold and arrogant like you think you’re better than everyone else and thats why you don’t talk to people or hang out with them but it’s really the opposite its like you’re so uncomfortable with yourself that you don’t wanna share it with anyone else so you just dont and people think you’re an asshole but you’re actually just really scared

(via jcrobins)

ask-an-mra-anything:

sure we’ve never had a woman president, the majority of politicians and CEOs are men, a woman needs a masters degree just to make the same money as a man with a BA doing the same job, rape cases are grossly under prosecuted, and we teach young girls that they’re “asking for” rape based on what they’re wearing

but let’s talk about the REAL issues like how some woman on the internet is selling a coffee mug with the words “male tears” printed on it

(via leu-enkephalin)

valkubus:

mycroftsbooty:

shslspookyscary:

adropofred:

comment s’appelle un chien qui vend des médicaments?

un pharmachien

why the fuck is this joke in french and why there is 26k notes am i missing something important

something really important

what do you call a dog that sells drugs?

a pharmacy

yeah it’s really only funny in french

(via carryonwaywardblogger)

haaaaaaaaave-you-met-ted:

j-willikers:

wicked-mint-leaves:

kateevangelistaauthor:

This is SO cool that I just had to share.

you clever fuckers

my teacher used this today

W+H+I+S+K+E+Y23+8+9+19+11+5+25 = 100%

haaaaaaaaave-you-met-ted:

j-willikers:

wicked-mint-leaves:

kateevangelistaauthor:

This is SO cool that I just had to share.

you clever fuckers

my teacher used this today

W+H+I+S+K+E+Y
23+8+9+19+11+5+25 = 100%

image

(via hanoten)

adulthoodisokay:

goldenclitoris:

THIS IS TRULY THE WILDEST SHIT I HAVE EVER SEEN AND I LOVE IT

holyshit

edwardspoonhands:

all-the-weird-things:

exploratorium:

mashable:

itscolossal:

A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady [VIDEO]

WHOA!

Too mind bending not to reblog!

i feel like this is exactly what Vincent Van Gogh saw and now i am crying 

GOTTA FIGURE OUT HOW TO WATCH THIS IN THE OCULUS!!!

edwardspoonhands:

all-the-weird-things:

exploratorium:

mashable:

itscolossal:

A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady [VIDEO]

WHOA!

Too mind bending not to reblog!

i feel like this is exactly what Vincent Van Gogh saw and now i am crying 

GOTTA FIGURE OUT HOW TO WATCH THIS IN THE OCULUS!!!

Two other women, also breast cancer survivors, said their husbands left them after they were diagnosed. Both had to have mastectomies (in case anyone doesn’t know, this is the surgical operation to remove one or both breasts).

The first woman said her husband told her that he would rather see her dead than see her lose her breasts. The second woman had her operation and waited all day to be picked up by her husband, who never arrived. By nightfall, one of the nurses offered to give her a ride, and she came home to find the house empty.

Obviously, these are extreme cases of a man’s reaction to his wife’s breast cancer, but this is what I see when I see the “I ♥ Boobies” bracelets. I see love of the body parts, not the person being treated—not the patient, not the victim, not the survivor.

My Beef with the “I Love Boobies” Bracelets (via politicalmachine)

(via jcrobins)

thatothernguyen:

are penguins even real omfg

(via hanoten)

browncoatfromtheshire:

M: This week, I discovered a terrible Earth disease called ‘loneliness’.

O: Do many people on Earth suffer from this illness?

M: Oh yes, sir. And how they suffer.

:(

(via autumnagain)

brianmichaelbendis:

Disney princesses by Heather Theurer

(via jcrobins)

Basically, this blog includes posts from the HP, DW, SPN, Sherlock, Firefly, and Star Trek fandoms, posts on feminism, and essentially anything I find amusing.

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